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JustBob October 28th, 2013 11:52am

A working mother has to take an average of six hours off a week to care for her chronically ill child (when the caregiver is unavailable). Should her department head factor in this time off when considering candidates for promotion?

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trav Instagram, travisdover
10/29/13 12:01 am

By God, he should factor in that time. That's what he gets paid to do. To make decisions that improve the company.

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Emma15 high school insomniac
10/28/13 7:36 pm

As a child with a chronic disease, I know how hard my parents work to take care of me and to pay the medical bills. I know that they can handle it if they're passionate about it.

WillametteKevin Mossopolis
10/28/13 10:57 am

If she a sick/personal time available, she should use that. Using it as a condition of promotion is discrimination. There are other factors like job performance, qualifications for the candidate position as far more important.

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trav Instagram, travisdover
10/29/13 12:04 am

Not being available all the time affects job performance

Itabliss Hello
10/28/13 9:57 am

If she is good at her job, those 6 hours aren't going to have a huge impact in most rational minds. But it should be taken into account, especially if the promotion would require more time.

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Itabliss Hello
10/28/13 10:02 am

For instance, my company employs a woman who is constantly calling off/leaving early/and, IMO, abusing FMLA. Reasons include caring for her grandchildren and various medical ailments. She also sucks at her job. We now have to document every single

Itabliss Hello
10/28/13 10:06 am

Thing this woman does wrong. However, I know several other people in our same dept that will have to leave early to pick up a child, or whatever, and they are in no danger. Why? Because their quality of work is excellent.

Rosebud Ohio
10/28/13 9:08 am

Yes, though it's a tough position. Unless it's a job that can be done from home during those 6 hours.

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GetEduc8d learning more everyday
10/28/13 8:06 am

Not really. If she's still performing well & meeting or exceeding the requirements of the job then it shouldn't matter at all. If she's not meeting the requirements for the promotion then it shouldn't matter what the reason is either.

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curly
10/28/13 7:44 am

I can't think of a reason why the dept head wouldn't consider this. They have to consider whats best for the business, not what's best for their employees' families.

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Zod Above Pugetropolis
10/28/13 7:34 am

Open availability without distractions would be a big plus when hiring.

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mikeey1962 on SOH where else
10/28/13 7:26 am

Yes but in a good way. I would much rather have someone wh cares for her family then just someone who works for me

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dahawwl Texas
10/28/13 7:20 am

As long as everything is considered for all candidates. She may be a perfect and high producing employee in every other way.

Squidboy Snarkapottamus
10/28/13 7:05 am

Women are usually caregivers and take FMLA leave at over twice the rate of men. This contributes to the so called 'income gap.' But leave gender out of the question. If any person took this much time off...would you promote them? I say no.

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ClarityRose Now taking suggestions
10/28/13 6:24 am

If it's FMLA, then I don't think it can be considered. If it's not FMLA then her company probably didn't follow the regulations re: informing her of her eligibility. Either way, it might be smarter for them to not factor in the time off...

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JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 8:39 am

I think it'll be a damned if you do damned if you don't, because a women with no kids might have a case as well, noting her availability and dedication to the company, if both their production are equal she might win her case

akrealist a log cabin in the woods
10/28/13 9:46 am

Assuming the employer and role fall under FML, then it should be 'invisible' re: your promotion decision. If FML is expired, even then it is likely still covered under the "association" piece of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA or ADAA).

EarlyBird Portland
10/28/13 6:10 am

Heck yes! Why am I going to promote someone that needs so much time off?

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EarlyBird Portland
10/28/13 6:12 am

Answer: I wouldn't

cass95 Jesus 2021
10/28/13 6:07 am

It's a slippery slope when you make work accommodations for someone. With the "where's mine" and "I'll sue" attitudes that run rampant, employers have to ensure all t's are crossed and i's are dotted.

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doctalk not all who wander r lost
10/28/13 6:04 am

1- does she complete her assigned tasks. 2- does she maintain morale if promotion is toward management. If yes to both promote.

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rons screw politicians
10/28/13 1:46 pm

So then she works more the 34 hours with flex time! Your question stated she didn't work 6 hrs a week, every week!

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 5:45 pm

I assume she's not on the Ford assembly line punching a clock.

XercesBlue ...
10/28/13 5:57 am

A girl at work was hired back at part time into a promoted position. She's great at her job, but she cannot play catch up enough to fulfill her obligations. I believe this time off should be considered in relation to her ability to get her work done

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XercesBlue ...
10/28/13 5:59 am

, fill a leadership role, and whether the hours will affect other employees/duties/customers/etc. There can be sympathy, but you don't want to make your whole team suffer by this unavailability.

XercesBlue ...
10/28/13 5:59 am

This is assuming she is being promoted into leadership, but the rest can remain the same for otherwise.

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 11:40 am

Thought you said she works only 34 hours a week compared to her workmates who work 40. Change caregivers.

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 5:56 am

So she's basically on a 4 day work week when everybody else works 5 days (34 hrs vs 40hrs). Many positions require additional (unpaid) hours on the job. Her absence is a big problem for promotions.

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rons screw politicians
10/28/13 9:54 am

What's wrong with getting anothe caregiver?

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 11:35 am

Flexible work hasn't necessitated this

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 1:47 pm

So then she works more the 34 hours with flex time! Your question stated she didn't work 6 hrs a week, every week!

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 1:50 pm

I had a situation once. My employee programmer had problems in in privates. The docs found nothing. He had to take off a lot! He Dad called in to say he won't be in. I made a deal, when he was good on weekends or nights he had to come in as make up time.

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 2:04 pm

Correct, meant her current work situation, where she can get the time off every week, negates the need for another caregiver, sorry for the confusion

kermie gaytopia
10/28/13 5:30 am

Does she get her job done? That's all that matters.

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JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 5:36 am

Sure, nothing outstanding, but a solid worker

Axl752 NY
10/28/13 5:45 am

Just getting the job done isn't usually enough for a promotion.

kermie gaytopia
10/28/13 5:54 am

Maybe not. The question wasn't would she get the promotion, just should her child be considered.

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 5:58 am

No consideration given for the child. What if my wife needed help or my mother or grammy? Get another caregiver!

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 6:03 am

In scoring for promotion, you assign a point system on traits, dependability is one, if she was suntanning six hours a week, this category would go down, is it fair to deduct the same points for her situation?

kermie gaytopia
10/28/13 8:33 am

One, because family care is legally protected; two, because it's the right thing to do; three, because in many jobs people can set their own hours. If she gets her job done she should be equally considered.

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 8:35 am

There was a dilemma that I constantly struggle with, if you sacrifice your relationship with your family for your career, should you be rewarded from that career?

kermie gaytopia
10/28/13 9:22 am

We're the most productive, prosperous, profitable nation in the world. It's shameful we would ask employees to choose between the two instead of family coming first as is the norm in much of the rest of the developed world.

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 9:53 am

Is Saudi Arabia, Japan, India, China, Iran developed countries?

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 9:59 am

What's wrong with getting another caregiver? You can't work 4 day+ and everybody else works 5?

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 11:37 am

We are constantly choosing between two for promotion, or else the corporate hierarchy pyramid would be more square shaped

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 11:41 am

In todays climate I think they'd want it circle shaped!

kermie gaytopia
10/28/13 2:26 pm

Lol is it really that easy in your life rons? Just pay for another caretaker! Sure! I'm sure every family can afford that haha

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 5:42 pm

Why does she have to take off 6 hours of company time a week again? I worked with many progressional women in marketing, product managers and sale. We had agreements about hard stops at meetings so the can get the kids. They could work from home at times.

rons screw politicians
10/28/13 5:44 pm

But when you have to run a business and employees are required to work then home issues are tabled. Everybody would love a 4 day week.

Axl752 NY
10/28/13 5:28 am

They should definitely consider this. Sure shes been dealt a rough hand but thats not the employers fault. From their perspective she is putting in almost a day less per week than other employees. They need the person for the position who will be most dedicated and reliable.

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Axl752 NY
10/28/13 5:29 am

She is lucky to have an employer nice enough to let het have those extra 6 hours a week.

XercesBlue ...
10/28/13 5:55 am

It seems harsh, but it's realistic. I definitely agree with axl.

Ebola1 Florida
10/28/13 5:14 am

Definitely, she's lucky to have a job.

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Abolitionist Voice of the people
10/28/13 5:13 am

Her department head should not consider this but I would

Abolitionist Voice of the people
10/28/13 5:53 am

Ideally, you want a boss that wouldn't consider that if you're the worker but as a boss I would. Sorry, should've worded it better

chickencookie It really is
10/28/13 4:54 am

There are compassionate people out there. Hopefully her boss is one of them.

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
10/28/13 5:04 am

Eventually the boss may have to explain why this woman was given a promotion