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BamaGirl October 20th, 2013 11:34pm

Do you think elected officials should be addressed by his/her title after leaving office? (e.g. Governor Mike Huckabee or Governor Eliot Spitzer) If you know where this practice originates, please comment & enlighten me.

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scottt
10/22/13 2:18 pm

Well dang gurl! How deeply does this issue bother you?

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BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 9:13 pm

It really bugs me. :)
I don't like the idea that politicians are somehow superior to the rest of us & I think continuing to refer to politicians after they leave office by their office title is a symptom of the problem.

scottt
10/21/13 5:46 pm

Even if they no longer are in office, they attained the title.

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 1:29 am

The people gave them the office by electing them. Elected officials are employed by the people. They are not a special class of people.

scottt
10/21/13 5:45 pm

Same goes for doctors, reverends, military officers and I think anyone who attains a high level/respectable title.

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BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 1:31 am

But doctors don't give up their degrees. Most military officials make a point to include retired in their name if the mention their title. Ministers or the like don't usually renounce their faith or position & retain a title.

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 1:33 am

My point is that these people were given a position by the electorate. Once they no longer hold the office, they should not be ADDRESSED by the title.

DerekWills Lone Star Gun Rights
10/21/13 4:19 am

Formally they should, but if I were a Congressman, Senator, Governor, President, I would insist my constituents call me Derek because I work for them. In a formal setting, I would understand them calling me by my title, even after I leave office.

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BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 1:35 am

I'm with you until the after leaving office. My point is the office had a time limit & the title ends with it. I have no problem with the position being listed as part of a resume, but to continue to address the person by the office title to me

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/22/13 1:37 am

adds to the divide between the "elected" class & the people. I think this is a symptom of the problem of career politicians.

Zealizabeth Probably the hospital
10/20/13 5:56 pm

I always say "Former Governor John Smith". It's a respect thing.

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BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/20/13 8:06 pm

Former, yes. My issue is with those who drop the former part.

Zealizabeth Probably the hospital
10/20/13 8:08 pm

Yeah if someone said Governor Riley I'd be really confused. I don't get that either.

2katz I live in Nebraska
10/20/13 5:06 pm

At least it helps us keep track of politicians for life.

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/20/13 4:56 pm

I just don't understand addressing them by the title of an office that they no longer hold. I can see saying former whatever to lend credence to what they have to say or have written, but I don't like them being addressed by that title.

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political Georgia
10/20/13 4:59 pm

It is just a way to give respect. Many will say former Governor, but I have heard it both ways.

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/20/13 8:02 pm

Former gov or whatever I get, but I hear interviewers address the person with a title they no longer hold. My point is they are no more deserving of respect than any one else. People don't address Herman Cain as CEO Herman Cain or the like.

BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
10/20/13 8:04 pm

I think this is part of the problem. We treat politicians like a special class, like an elite group, this is part of our problem as a nation.

Arya8
10/21/13 5:26 am

I agree.