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Ucaz February 10th, 2019 2:41pm

Do you think it should be a legal requirement to vaccinate your children?

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4boot LaTrineodeur, MN
02/10/19 9:34 pm

No, freedom rules.

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Okie1967 Is Biden self aware
02/10/19 7:18 pm

My body, my choice.

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apparition Tacoma
02/10/19 5:10 pm

Anti-vaxxers should not be around vaccinated citizens. Maybe we could designate a single state just for them? Like Florida?

MoOoOoOse A Demagogic Country
02/11/19 1:42 am

Well you shouldn’t be scared of them since you got your vaccines. If you got yours and anti vax got sick, you theoretically wouldn’t get sick because that is the whole point of vaccination

apparition Tacoma
02/11/19 8:53 am

With that logic I shouldn’t worry about people who drive without licenses or a seatbelt because I have and use them.

MoOoOoOse A Demagogic Country
02/11/19 12:22 pm

What? The two are not analogous. If you are vaccinated for a disease, you literally cannot get it, because once you get a disease, you cannot get the same strain of disease again.

This has nothing to do with licenses. If another person does not have his/her license, this causes an increased chance of them crashing into you. If someone does not have a vaccine, they have an increased chance of contracting that disease and passing it to someone who is not vaccinated, but if you are vaccinated, you CANNOT get the same strain, only a mutated form, in which case your vaccination is void whether or not you get it.

And yes, you shouldn’t worry about other people not wearing seatbelts as long as they are not sitting in your car. Not sure what that had to do with vaccination.

apparition Tacoma
02/11/19 11:16 pm

I chose driving for an analogy because if others chose to avoid precautions, it could affect you. If you get into a head on collision and the other driver isn’t wearing a seatbelt, they’ll come and sit in the car with you.
Vaccines strengthen our immunity and mostly protect us from disease however, there is still a small chance of illness and death.
Here in WA, we currently have a measles outbreak. Per the CDC, about 3 in 100 will still get Measles if they received 2 doses of the vaccine. This is why pro-vaxxers say that it’s an issue that affects all of us.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/10/19 3:46 pm

For certain things, such as the Measles virus, yes. It presents a danger to society.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 5:06 am

The measles are no more dangerous than the flu.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/11/19 5:20 am

Dangerous to the individual? I’d probably agree. However, the Rubeola virus is much more contagious and infects about 90% of those exposed that are within susceptible groups. This lends it a great power to become very dangerous on a large scale if people are not seeking the proper vaccinations. Unlike the Influenza viruses, we have one key vaccine against Rubeola, and it is nearly always effective. Personally, I get a Flu shot every year, but I get it if you don’t.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 6:35 am

If vaccines work like you claim, then those that get them should have no fear of those that don’t.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/11/19 6:53 am

It’s called herd immunity, and nothing is 100% effective. Furthermore, the Rubeola virus vaccinations occur only a year into a child’s life, and then again later. This puts newborns and the young at a great risk.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 7:53 am

“Herd immunity” is not a scientifically-validated concept.

kellybroganmd.com/herd-immunity-fact-fiction/

Vaccinations do not prevent outbreaks of any illnesses. Proper hygiene, hand-washing, and temporary containment of highly infected individuals are the best methods of preventing an outbreak among society. The fear-mongering and shaming using falsified information must stop. He’ll educate people on what is proven to work and what isn’t.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/11/19 8:04 am

Vaccinations, along with proper sanitation, are integral to eradicating and reducing the occurrence in humans when it comes to certain viruses. We have (basically) eradicated Polio using these mechanisms globally — vaccines, which are regulated and tested heavily, do work and are nothing to be afraid of.

I also do agree that herd immunity hasn’t been proven, but it is accepted by most of the doctors and researchers I know, and is seen as a valid concept.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 8:26 am

Polio was being drastically eliminated as a disease well before vaccines were even created. That can be directly attributed to proper hygiene, cleaner water, and sterilization methods for foods, etc.

www.google.com/amp/s/www.researchgate.net/figure/The-polio-death-rate-was-decreasing-on-its-own-before-the-vaccine-was-introduced_fig2_252553744/amp

It’s not that vaccines don’t work at all. There is some benefit but they’re not the magic pill that the CDC and some doctors seem to portray them as. To further compound the problem, they are not honest about the negative effects caused by the adjuvants added to boost the immune response. Scientific study has shown many of them cause neurological disorders and to inhibit a proper immune cascade response when the pathogen vaccines against is encountered. They will have a weakened response compared to acquiring the pathogen without a vaccine.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 8:28 am

You can look at rates of autism and other neurological disorders and how they have risen as the number of vaccines given to each generation has increased. There is a direct correlation. We know thimerosal is dangerous in the body yet it is still used in some vaccines, especially when directly injected into a newborn or young child.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/11/19 8:38 am

You speak of the correlation between autism and vaccines, but then ignore the correlation between vaccinations and the reduction of polio incidence. Correlation does not equal causation — all scientists know that.

Furthermore, the fears of the danger of Thiomersal have been unfounded, and that is why it is in continued use as a preservative. Thiomersal contains ethylmercury which is much less likely to cause any direct harm. There have been numerous other explanations for the uptick in Autism, and I invite you to read on them. It is not my specialty, but I do still advocate for vaccines to be utilize, and would like to cut through a lot of the misinformation out there. If there was solid proof vaccines caused autism, I would be the first to oppose them — there isn’t, though.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 9:23 am

Then I invite you to look at the research that directly links vaccines to autism, including from thimerosal:

adventuresinautism.blogspot.com/2007/06/no-evidence-of-any-link.html?m=1

You’re incorrectly assuming that I’m dismissing any correlation to the decrease in polio cases and vaccines. I have simply shown that the polio disease incidence rates were already rapidly decreasing before vaccines were even created. The vaccines back then also didn’t have the same adjuvants that are added to them today.

JamesAndersonMD La Jolla, CA
02/11/19 12:05 pm

I’m sorry, kscott, but as a medical doctor, I’ve looked at a lot of information and studies. I do not believe vaccines cause autism. You are free to continue that belief, but please consider the consequences you may have, especially on our youngest children.

kscott516 Masks fail
02/11/19 12:38 pm

I’ve provided you links to actual peer-reviewed studies showing a direct link to vaccines and autism. I’ve also linked articles from other medical doctors that have done extensive research on them as well. They, too, used to believe the same as you until they did further, independent research. Why do you discount them? I know they don’t teach everything about vaccines, their ingredients, and how the body reacts to the adjuvants in med school.

I’ve done my research and am well aware of the pros and cons. I’m not anti-vaccine. I’m anti-multi-dose vials that contain harmful adjuvants.

coco5300 Colorado
02/10/19 3:01 pm

No. But if they aren’t vaccinated you shouldn’t be able to bring them in public.

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kscott516 Masks fail
02/10/19 2:58 pm

Absolutely not. Injecting kids with heavy metals and poisons under government force is the last thing we should ever do.

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coco5300 Colorado
02/10/19 3:00 pm

LOL WHAT THE HELL

FriendlyGuy Erected
02/10/19 2:35 pm

Yes unless we want some smallpox shit to return

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kscott516 Masks fail
02/10/19 2:58 pm

Smallpox wasn’t eradicated by vaccines. It went away because of better hygiene.

DonWichita Kansas
02/10/19 12:29 pm

It is already a legal requirement, the penalty is you cannot send your kids to Public Schools.
𝕯𝖔𝖓𝖂𝖎𝖈𝖍𝖎𝖙𝖆

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4JC Christian Pastors Wife
02/10/19 4:16 pm

That’s actually not true. It is a local and state decision.

If the family has a religious or other reason not to vaccinate, they’re allowed to send the child to school or day care.....they just have to have this statement on file....at least here in AL, the last time I checked.

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DonWichita Kansas
02/11/19 2:38 am

Thanks for the correction.
In light of that my answer to the poll is 𝙔𝙚𝙨.

4JC Christian Pastors Wife
02/11/19 10:17 am

You’re welcome! I probably wouldn’t have known this either, other than the fact that we once had church members that didn’t believe in vaccinations and I’ve also worked at day cares and in the public education system.

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eman2056 Everywhere
02/10/19 10:40 am

Yes, that was one of my bills for YIG

PamGH Washington
02/10/19 10:21 am

No. It’s free country, but I’d bar them from school... they can home school

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adman4285
02/10/19 8:54 am

In the interest of national health I think certain vaccinations should be required.

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Maineiac Maine
02/10/19 7:54 am

My kids were both vaccinated according to our doctors schedule (they are now 19) but I do not feel it should be made a legal requirement.

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