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philmchawk Gaia Agia
04/14/16 2:07 am

The spelling judgment is found in the Authorized Version of the Bible. However, the spelling judgement (with e added) largely replaced judgment in the United Kingdom in a non-legal context. In the context of the law, however, judgment is preferred. In the U.S. judgment strongly prevails. As with many such spelling differences, both forms are equally acceptable in Canada and Australia, although judgment is more common in Canada and judgement in Australia.

philmchawk Gaia Agia
04/14/16 2:07 am

I much prefer judgement. Better form, IMO.

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:11 am

I've always thought judgment was one of the stupidest spellings of any word. I always pronounce it "jud-ig-ment"

Bobnpt The Ocean State
04/07/16 6:42 am

Judgment at Nuremberg
No E
I believe, although both are acceptable, British = E, American = no E
?????

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freshstartlisa Birmingham, AL
04/06/16 8:27 am

I read once that "judgment" entered as the official spelling after one of those largely unsuccessful attempts at spelling reform.

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swervin Maryland
04/05/16 9:08 pm

Judgment. Judgement. Both are good, according to Apple.

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Doopy Remedial Americanism
04/05/16 9:04 pm

Can we have half an e?

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badattitude no place like home
04/05/16 7:59 pm

English or American? If you try to use voice text, you get judgment. Which is proper in American language.

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K4tn1ss Dont look in the closet
04/05/16 7:19 pm

Idiots if you have autocorrect and got that wrong.

IamKatherine Respect
04/05/16 7:05 pm

I mean technically neither are wrong

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NK257 Rural Iowa
04/05/16 7:04 pm

Technically, both are correct. American is judgment. British is judgement. Similar to theater and theatre (I sometimes use either). There isn't one right answer

philmchawk Gaia Agia
04/14/16 2:09 am

I use theater if it's cinema, and theatre if it's a play.

MJSeals J.D.
04/05/16 7:03 pm

I love how people are acting self righteous over other for this. Was unaware we were in third grade.

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Xemanis Lawful Good
04/06/16 6:18 am

How judgmental of them

Xemanis Lawful Good
04/06/16 6:18 am

No reason to pass judgement over spelling a word correctly

4boot LaTrineodeur, MN
04/05/16 4:01 pm

Majority is wrong...

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TreeHugs Oregon
04/05/16 2:33 pm

Judgment just looks wrong! I've always spelled it JUDGEMENT. I didn't realize the other spelling was accepted.

ClayTownR California
04/05/16 2:06 pm

When will we remember the use of "chieves," "rooves," and "staves"

FacePalm That Trick Never Works
04/05/16 12:41 pm

Although the traditional/formal spelling is judgment, judgement is gaining ground in usage for non-legal purposes. Both are acceptable. Judgment is preferred for formal application.

Language and spelling change over time... *shrug*.

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scrpnHOG Arizona
04/05/16 12:33 pm

Let's ask Siri - judgment

It worked !

TomLaney1 Jesus is Lord
04/05/16 2:49 pm

Siri is a terrible speller, and no authority whatever in my book.

⚜ ᎢᎻᎬ ᏩᎡᎪᎷᎷᎪᎡ ᏢᎾᏞᏆᏟᎬ ⚜

mark1950 Columbia, South Carolina
04/05/16 12:27 pm

One of my elementary teachers, back in the '50's, said that, one day, teachers with inadequate educations would rise up to change simple, basic things, like "judgement". She warned us not to succumb to such foolishness. Nothing personal, y'all. 😎😎

LAW1 Georgia
04/05/16 12:14 pm

In America, use JUDGMENT. In the UK, use JUDGEMENT. In America, use THEATER. In the UK, use THEATRE.

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GenericProfile Custom Tags Are Gay
04/05/16 12:12 pm

It's judgement. Judgment is literally spellchecked on my phone, lmao.

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SatchmoeLife
04/05/16 1:24 pm

Your phone will change its spell check to something you write more, like wrud will change to wryd (what are you/u doing) just because I say wryd more

smarkosa wisco
04/05/16 11:52 am

I work in the legal field and we use judgment - all of our court mandated forms say "judgment" as well. Not saying the other is incorrect, just that I use what I have to use.

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gounseen Texas Forever
04/05/16 11:30 am

Just use good judgement

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Zod Above Pugetropolis
04/05/16 11:24 am

I write it without the extra e, but I see it both ways a lot. I say it without the unnecessary e too, juj-ment, not juj-eh-ment.

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FancyNapalm Psychosis Circle
04/05/16 11:23 am

Honestly, I've corrected people when they write "judgment." I thought there was only 1 spelling - JUDGEMENT. Ooops! 😳😮 Guess I was wrong lol!

I'm pretty sure that's what I was taught too..... Hmmmm????

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Tesla Florida
04/05/16 11:11 am

I spell it judgement but apparently both are correct?

MrChris80 California
04/05/16 10:53 am

Where's @tlaney1's take already??

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TomLaney1 Jesus is Lord
04/05/16 2:42 pm

Sorry, folks! I slept all morning and went to an early movie this afternoon.
I have devised a mnemonic for you to make it easy (hear this in a British Cockney accent, where they "drop their aitches"):
• If a judge determines your fate, 'e renders a judgEment;
When you use your OWN judgment, 'e's no longer involved.

So judgment is personal, and judgement is legal. Note that some authorities disagree, but they are not the SoH
⚜ ᏩᎡᎪᎷᎷᎪᎡ ᏢᎾᏞᏆᏟᎬ ⚜,
so who cares what THEY think? :^D

MrChris80 California
04/05/16 4:13 pm

Ooh, awesome, thanks for the explanation! :)

susanr Colorado
04/05/16 10:47 am

Either spelling is perfectly OK. I believe "judgment" is more often used by Americans and "judgement" by Brits, but apparently there's a little history involved there. I'm not going to worry about it.

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kywrite augusta, ga
04/05/16 10:27 am

British or American? Americans drop the "e".

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AKCowboysFan Anchorage m8
04/05/16 11:09 am

Sorry I accidentally cut that off rudely. I was going to say,

Not to the best of my knowledge. Is it a regional thing?

kywrite augusta, ga
04/05/16 1:32 pm

Nope. It's a general thing. Judgment is the accepted spelling in the US, though lawyers often spell it with the "e". The internet (which AP style is finally letting us lowercase) may force a change due to common usage. But as a rule, it's no "e" in the US.

Trust me, I'm a professional here.

gevans792 Utah
04/05/16 10:21 am

I usually assume that you drop the 'e' when adding a suffix. ...but maybe that's just when the suffix begins with a vowel.

17millionTwats Leeds, UK
04/05/16 9:53 am

Ive always written "judgement" maybe its one of these annoying americanisms you guys insist on using 😉

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Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:55 am

Definitely lol.

JoeTGH Five Polls Daily
04/05/16 10:06 am

Equip. Equipment. Measure. Measurement. Judge. Judgement. It's just that simple.

kywrite augusta, ga
04/05/16 1:34 pm

It's an exception to normal rules. Judgment.

firefly5 the verse
04/05/16 7:01 pm

@BritishGuy : I use judgement. I also use double consonants to keep vowels short (ex: travelled, not traveled). I don't see how "traveled" wouldn't be pronounced trav-EEL-d. I know that one is accepted both ways, so I don't believe there's a penalty for either preference.

My question (maybe you can help me here, @tlaney1 ), is why we use "buses" for a plural of the noun, but "bussed" for a past tense of the verb. Or why "buses" wouldn't rhyme with "fuses," I suppose.

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:07 am

Firely: why do "bologna" and "pony" rhyme?!

17millionTwats Leeds, UK
04/08/16 3:21 am

I would guess because bologna is an Italian word and so doesnt follow English rules

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:34 am

Goose is an english word and doesn't follow english rules (goose to geese not gooses)(and I guess you could say its a greek word since the plural form is based on the greek plural forms). English is an amalgamation of different words from different languages stitched together to make something half-way coherent. I know you're british, and maybe you pride yourself in living in the country that started the awful worldwide phenomenon that is english, but the language makes no sense and sounds stupid. At least its not like french with its 5 silent letters, though. Wait, "though" has a silent "u", "g" and "h", and those three letters perfectly describe my feelings toward this language.

17millionTwats Leeds, UK
04/08/16 3:41 am

Haha yeah I'm not particularly proud of English or at least other peoples attitudes to English and their thoughts on its importance compared to other languages. It is essentially the result of an unprotected orgy between French, German, Latin and Greek turned up for the last bit.

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:43 am

You... This is the best sentence I have ever read!

17millionTwats Leeds, UK
04/08/16 3:47 am

Haha well thats probably how English formed 😂

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:52 am

yeah, that is how it formed, there is no doubting that. I've just never heard it so eloquently put!

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 4:00 am

I just want to throw this out there: my name-tag-thing is in spanish and not english. It means "umbrella duck". Though i'm speaking english right now, i will not let it represent me.😤🇪🇸

17millionTwats Leeds, UK
04/08/16 5:52 am

Haha 💃🏿🇪🇸 #freedomfromenglish

DoctorWasdarb Marxist Leninist Maoist
04/05/16 9:52 am

I thought it was judgement, but I was writing an essay yesterday which told me otherwise. (The red line)

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Crawdaddy11 LEGEND of FIRSTS
04/05/16 9:32 am

Wow this is better than those old fraction division math problems

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Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:56 am

I'd like to see one of those done as a main poll. Not everybody is familiar with PEMDAS, it seems.

susanr Colorado
04/05/16 10:54 am

Laserbeam - Let's not go there. Man, some of the longest, and at times nastiest, comments sections have resulted from that stuff - involving just one particular infamous math problem. The last time someone mentioned it in an unrelated poll, I said, as above, "Let's not do that ever again." Tony noticed that, and almost immediately posted it as a new poll... So I'm probably jinxing myself, and all of us, by cautioning against it yet again.

It's not just not knowing PEMDAS, although that was 98% of the problem, the first 2 times. There's standard PEMDAS, and there are variants of PEMDAS, and then there are folks who have apparently persuasive arguments otherwise. The 3rd time around, it wasn't just PEMDAS-ignorant people arguing against the accepted correct answer - it was some of the smartest most math-savvy people here.

Honestly, I was looking forward to the usual political/abortion/religion battles, after that.

ParaguasPato Columbus GA
04/08/16 3:09 am

Oh my gosh... Now i want to know what this math problem is... Tell me... Please... I promise not to erupt

Malekithe Hades
04/05/16 9:02 am

While some claim that Noah Webster first recorded the spelling of judgment in his 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language, judgment has been the prevailing spelling on both sides of the pond since the late 1600s.

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Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:39 am

Both are acceptable spellings of the word. If you don't believe me, try typing both and see if either one has the red line underneath.

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iBakes California
04/05/16 8:50 am

"Yolo" doesn't have a red line either. Not sure that's the best judgment of worth in the world.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:52 am

Yolo is a dictionary term as of 2014. Fun fact.

iBakes California
04/05/16 8:53 am

Yeah, so that's not exactly the best argument for "judgement" validity

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:55 am

If the dictionary isn't valid in your opinion, then that sounds like your own problem lol. Academics don't disregard the dictionary like you do and in the dictionary, both spellings are listed.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:58 am

It's also no secret that "judgement" is the older English spelling and "judgment" is more of an American thing.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:00 am

I never said the dictionary is not valid, I said being in the dictionary doesn't guarantee best validity. Let's practice a little reading comprehension here.

Saying they have equal worth/usage because they're both in the dictionary is like saying carpe diem and yolo are interchangeable in all settings and yolo is always appropriate to use. It's not.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:01 am

Actually that's not true, judgment is the classic spelling. A simple google search will help clear that up for you. grammarist.com/spelling/judgment-judgement/

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:03 am

I appreciate you linking me to an obscure blog. Scroll down to the bottom of this page from Merriam Webster, a source that can be trusted, and see the section titled "did you know?". Now you know. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judgment

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:06 am

So are you ready to admit now that both are correct, like I originally stated? Or would you like to continue being unreasonable and arguing with Merriam Webster?

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:07 am

You realize that on the page you linked they're talking about two guys with different *opinions* on this, right? But yeah, pretend what I gave is just an "obscure blog" and the links within tell you nothing. 😉 have a good day.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:09 am

It's funny you mentioned reading comprehension earlier. You seem to be struggling with it. Let me help you out. "Did You Know?
Judgment can also be spelled 'judgement'".

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:09 am

I've never said judgement is not a word in the dictionary or a word that's used. You need to actually read my comments.

iBakes California
04/05/16 8:39 am

Well that's an interesting educational attainment breakdown.

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Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:42 am

How's that? All educational levels seem to be in agreement that "judgement" is the preferred spelling.

iBakes California
04/05/16 8:52 am

Because it's fairly in a row, level wise. It's interesting that a formal education seems to be so directly related to using the formal/proper spelling.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:19 am

Interpreting statistics is hard. Only 36% of those with a doctorate prefer what you see as the formal spelling. Which inversely means 64%, aka the majority, of highly educated folks prefer the "informal" spelling. Hmmm, makes you wonder.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:23 am

There is no correlation between education level and which spelling is preferred when the majority of every education level prefers the same spelling.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:26 am

Holy shit, 36% for one means that 64% indicated the other option in a dichotomous response?! THANK GOD YOU'RE HERE TO TELL ME OTHERWISE I WOULD HAVE NEVER KNOWN!!!

Nothing I've said is contradicted by a larger percentage using the less correct spelling. The educational trend I highlighted still exists. Your quest to prove me wrong did more poorly here than it did above.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:27 am

Apparently you don't know what "correlation" means. Yikes.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:34 am

Correlation: a mutual relationship or connection between two or more things. There is no correlation between education level and which spelling is preferred. It's not hard to see that. Both spellings are correct and it's a matter of personal preference. The statistics clearly indicate that those with a higher education tend to prefer "judgement", and I'm not sure why you're so passionate and/or bitter about this lol. I hope your day gets better.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:35 am

Your first two sentence contradict each other.

Here, let me help your judgment: www.stat.yale.edu/Courses/1997-98/101/correl.htm

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:36 am

That is, those with a higher education prefer the same spelling as those with little/no education, therefore no correlation. Get it now?

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:39 am

"I'm not sure why you're so passionate and/or bitter about this"

I was going to say the same about you while seeing you on multiple threads so worked up that you aren't even comprehending the responses you're reading. Really, no one is arguing that judgement is not a word. No need to be so hellbent on this.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:40 am

There is a seeming correlation between educational attainment and preference for the use of "judgment" - this is what I said in my first two comments. It is not a hard concept. This should not be so difficult for you. Take a step back and look at what I am saying again.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:49 am

I know what you said lol. Are you reading what I'm saying? Because for several comments now I've been refuting your interpretation of there being any correlation between the two. Repeating yourself over and over Trump-style isn't going to change the lack of a seeming correlation here. Whether you ask a kindergartner or a 30 year old with a doctorate, based on these results both of them are more likely to say they prefer "judgement". If you can't agree that, based on the results of this poll, education level does not correlate to preference, then we'll just have to agree to disagree with each other's interpretation and go about our day.

iBakes California
04/05/16 9:52 am

Saying people are more likely to use judgement and that there's a relationship between educational attainment and preference for using judgment are two totally different things. They can both exist at the same time without contradicting each other. And guess what? That's exactly what is happening here. This is not at all difficult.

gonzoboy Arizona
04/05/16 8:35 am

I know both are considered acceptable, but for some reason, I've always preferred the 'e'. I don't wanna be cured, if I don't have to be.

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CPizan
04/05/16 7:55 am

I believe either spelling is acceptable.

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BamaGirl ROLL TIDE from Arizona
04/05/16 7:26 am

W/o the e, but it will always look weird to me!

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Liberty 4,032,064
04/05/16 7:08 am

Judgment is the correct spelling

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Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 8:38 am

Both are correct actually.

Liberty 4,032,064
04/05/16 8:56 am

No, "judgement" is just a common misspelling.

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/05/16 9:01 am

Judgement is the original English spelling. Judgment came later. So again, neither are incorrect nor misspellings. Dictionaries either list both or make a side-note of alternate spellings.

Liberty 4,032,064
04/05/16 10:06 am

That's not even true. "Judgment" is the original and correct spelling. It isn't really up for dispute, haha.

kealad1
04/06/16 4:04 pm

Both are correct.
public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/judgement.html

Oh, and judgement came first.
www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judgment

It really doesn't matter. I prefer it with an e, though. Looks better 😜

Laserbeam Crazy bird lady
04/06/16 4:09 pm

I tried to explain that to him/her, but some people always have to be right and prefer to keep their ears and mind closed (no matter the topic). I appreciate the links but I doubt it was worth your time. Oh well 😁

Liberty 4,032,064
04/06/16 4:56 pm

It's apparently a fairly common myth that "judgement" was once used commonly in England, but you can actually look back at past literary works and see that they used the correct spelling ;)

PrinceBlake Bama Born
04/05/16 7:01 am

My phone gives me a choice for either spelling

PrinceBlake Bama Born
04/05/16 7:02 am

Pretty sure the correct one is judgment

celloVirtuoso buried in sheet music
04/05/16 7:07 am

Yes, it's judgment. My AP Lit teacher made me retake a spelling test twice for misspelling it. I'll never forget it now.

Muhammad The Prophet
04/05/16 7:01 am

Classic America, screwing up English again.

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celloVirtuoso buried in sheet music
04/05/16 6:59 am

The majority of people obviously made a poor judgment on this poll.

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Rosebud Ohio
04/05/16 7:07 am

They're both correct.

celloVirtuoso buried in sheet music
04/05/16 7:10 am

Judgment is the standard spelling. My AP Lit teacher made me retake a spelling test twice so I wouldn't misspell it again. She says for formal writing definitely go with judgment.

yepnope Maryland
04/05/16 3:25 pm

She should have told you it means absolutely nothing to choose one over the other. It's a silly thing to spend more than 1 second thinking about.

celloVirtuoso buried in sheet music
04/07/16 9:41 am

I trust my AP Literature knows what she's doing. If she says use judgment, I'm gonna use judgment.