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MrMilkdud June 10th, 2014 2:42am

You are talking to your friend in their native language, which is not English. Every time an English word comes up, they say it with a heavy American accent (as opposed to their own accent). Are they being culturally sensitive or silly?

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Comments: Add Comment

bMyComrade Stumptown
06/11/14 10:43 pm

I just prefer pronouncing words correctly, there's nothing "fake" to me in that. I'm not being "culturally sensitive" when I say foreign words correctly in my history classes, I'm being accurate.

LadyA Earth Explorer
06/10/14 9:21 am

I grew up bilingual and can't help it. Actually took part in a study back in Denmark about the use of English words in the Danish language.

Why would I pronounce an English word with a Danish accent... Ever?

MrMilkdud
06/10/14 11:44 am

You may be a unique case if you speak both languages without either being affected by the other.
Most bilingual speakers, however, will speak one language with a native accent and the second language will have an accent carried over from the first.

JustBob Your anger fascinates me
06/10/14 5:01 am

I haven't heard people from other countries do this. Been around many, but I've always heard them stick to their accent

PartyFree Nowhere in Particular
06/09/14 11:14 pm

I do it when saying Spanish words in an English conversation. Buenos Aires, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Chile are some of the places for which it is quite painful for me to say with an American accent. It's the same with English words en castellano.

MrMilkdud
06/10/14 11:46 am

Maybe no one has told you this, but it sounds silly to do that, and most native speakers don't mind hearing English speakers say words with an English accent because they are tolerant of other languages.

RJ1969 SoCal
06/09/14 8:20 pm

I witness this on a daily basis. They freely interchange their native languages and English.

Reply
EarlyBird Portland
06/09/14 8:42 pm

Isn't it mostly with their names?

RJ1969 SoCal
06/09/14 8:46 pm

No. They flip back and forth, sometimes switching language mid-sentence, then back again.

RJ1969 SoCal
06/09/14 8:49 pm

Common with the Chinese, Hindi, French, and Farsi-speaking folks, who speak perfectly good English, but their brains just mix it all up.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 8:52 pm

I had to deal with the same thing in San Antonio.
It was irritating because native Spanish speakers routinely mixed in English words, but when I mixed in english words (that I knew they knew) they'd act offended just to give me a hard time.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 8:54 pm

But when they did toss in random English words, they didn't bother to mimick an American accent. And they made it pretty clear they thought it was ridiculous when native English speakers tried to use an accent with random words or names.

RJ1969 SoCal
06/09/14 9:27 pm

Whoa! I think someone slipped me something in my drink!

youtu.be/vxiSP_ch_oI

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:32 pm

Somebody needs to give that video an award

ladyniner81 no hope for humanity
06/10/14 11:39 am

Who ever made that video has issues LMAO

TRJake Pendragon
06/09/14 8:13 pm

Well, in German, people usually say 'hamburger' in an American/English accent to mean the food, whereas the say 'Hamburger' in a German accent to mean a person from Hamburg. At least I think that's what you're talking about...

Reply
kermie gaytopia
06/09/14 8:31 pm

He probably thinks it's stupid for someone to say Spanish words with an accent.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:36 pm

1. Try saying "Kermie" with a Spanish accent. It can't be done.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:36 pm

2. This poll was inspired by a friend of
mine who grew up speaking Spanish, and thinks it's funny to mix in English words using a Minnesotan accent.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:39 pm

3. Also, another friend of mine is learning polish because he's relocating there in a few weeks to open up a satellite office for a nonprofit where I used to work.
When he mixes in an English word, he inexplicably uses a polish accent.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:41 pm

So yes, while I do think it is unforgivably ignorant to use a fake accent when using words from other languages, my motivation for this poll is a little more complex than what your incessant conservative bashing mentality would lead you to believe.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 9:44 pm

But if it makes you feel better, I typed that last comment with a thick Guatemalan accent.
touch.dailymotion.com/video/x67fkv_birdcage_shortfilms

kermie gaytopia
06/09/14 9:49 pm

Sorry, TL;DR. My brain doesn't have space for very many words; it's too busy incessantly bashing conservatives.

EarlyBird Portland
06/09/14 8:02 pm

Even if I say my name, I'll say it with the same foreign accent we were speaking. I wouldn't suddenly say "EarlyBird" with a strong English accent.

GlennBeck Becks inner thoughts
06/09/14 7:59 pm

I absolutely hate when my gardener does this. I tell him no useo el poolo, and when he says SURE I can tell he is being over sensitive because he no speako good English.

Reply
Rosebud Ohio
06/09/14 7:54 pm

It's silly, unless the word is commonly pronounced that way (like jalapeno).

Praetorianus Fair enough.
06/09/14 7:50 pm

Respective examples: Lass uns einen "Hayamburrger" essen. / Let's eat a "Humm-boorger".

Reply
EarlyBird Portland
06/09/14 7:50 pm

I think it's silly!
Why do people do that?

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 7:57 pm

Maybe they're trying to be sensitive to my needs as an American?
They're trying to show respect for out rich linguistic heritage?

EarlyBird Portland
06/09/14 7:59 pm

Nice try but I don't think so.

MrEdwin Mystery
06/09/14 8:39 pm

From my experience, native Spanish speakers make fun of native English speakers when they don't attempt to properly say the word in Spanish, with the accent and all. Behind their backs of course

Praetorianus Fair enough.
06/09/14 7:48 pm

A bit silly since it interrupts the flow. Same if they DO talk English and pronounce every foreign word we borrowed from their mother tongue with a thick accent of that language.

Reply
MrMilkdud
06/09/14 7:48 pm

You had to pick one to comment.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 7:58 pm

Nevermind, you picked "sensitive"

Jack14 Massachusetts
06/09/14 8:01 pm

Yeah, its like picking one of the candidates in a "Romney vs. Obama" poll. Had to pick one just so I can bash both of them.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 8:04 pm

Yeah, you can say you "randomly" chose sensitive.
But I think that's a bit more than a random choice, given our low agreement rating.

swervin Maryland
06/09/14 8:04 pm

Kind of like a giant douche VS a turd sandwich?

Jack14 Massachusetts
06/09/14 8:05 pm

I'd say 55.4% is about average. Maybe I am wrong.

MrMilkdud
06/09/14 8:06 pm

Bad example, Swervin.
Sometimes you need a giant douche if you want to solve a giant problem.

swervin Maryland
06/09/14 8:07 pm

The giant douche would have been the better choice. Too bad we got stuck with the turd sandwich.